SoundCloud
https://soundcloud.com/susan-koenig

These SoundCloud audio recordings allow you to "attend" a number of my classes at your own convenience.  Thank you to those who have given me such positive feedback and received help for their aches and pains.


12 - 1 - 18 Movement Organized Along the Three Planes or Dimensions of Space In this class we pay attention not only to the sensations of the movements we are doing, but also which plane or planes are involved. The sagittal plane gives us flexion and extension; the frontal plane gives us lateral and medial movement; the horizontal plane gives us rotation. Moving from this awareness helps our posture, balance, coordination, and usually decreases pain, stiffness, and tight muscles.


11 - 3 - 18 Pelvis and Pelvic Floor Today's class focuses on the pelvis with an emphasis on the pelvic floor. We'll start with some somatic movement warm-ups including an unusual, gentle series of head/neck movements beginning in the eyes. We'll also focus on breathing with awareness of both the thoracic/breathing and pelvic floor diaphragms. We'll do some basic Daily Cat Movements as well as bringing our pelvis through its basic six movements: flexion and extension, R and L lateral flexion, and internal and external rotation. Don't miss the wonderful somatic pelvic floor movement I learned from Judith Aston.


10 - 6 - 18 Connecting Painful Areas Both Locally and Throughout Your Body In this class we'll connect an area of the body, for example, the neck, to both surrounding areas and, as much as possible, throughout the whole body. Why? We are organized as a whole. Pain may be generated from right where the pain is located, but more often, the pain comes from other areas that have a myo-fascial (muscle-fascia) connection that we may or may not be aware of. Neck pain may come from the feet; shoulder pain may come from the center of your body. Learn to expand your movements possibilities and see if that relieves your pain or areas of discomfort.


8 - 4 - 18 Standing Weight Distribution and Head-Neck to Foot Movements   We started class in standing, experiencing weight distribution in the soles of our feet moving forward-backward, side to side, and in contralateral rotation. Then we went to floor movements involved in coordinating head-neck and foot movements, noticing what was happening in the low back, hips, knees, and more. We integrated these movements with Daily Cat Routine movements.


7 - 7- 18 How To Access The Back   In this class we'll explore various ways to get into all parts of the back: the neck, the high upper back, between the shoulder blades, low mid back, low back, and sacrum/pelvis. We worked from supine, prone and side-lying and used various reference muscles, as a guide. For example, we worked with reference muscles: latissimus dorsi, upper trapezius, levator scapula, rhomboids, lower trapezius, and paravertebrals.


5 - 5 - 18 Deep Versus Superficial Musculature   Today's class focused on differentiating deep and superficial musculature in two ways. First we learned about some anatomical information of some of the deep muscles such as the multifidi, transverse abdominis, quadratus lumborun, and the internal oblique. Then in our somatic movements we practiced focusing our awareness either more deeply or more superficially. We noticed not only the difference in sensations but also how we could explore a fuller movement by incorporating deep muscle control as well as superficial muscular participation.


4 - 7 - 18 Psoas and Scapula   In this class we explored movements relating to low back and pelvic comfort via the psoas and iliacus muscles. We explored shoulder girdle comfort via scapular movements and muscles, particularly the upward and downward rotators.


3 - 3 - 18 Lower Extremity   Class started with some anatomical information about the lower extremity. Then we proceeded to do somatic movements related to the hips, knees, ankles, feet, and toes. We started with a few torso movements so that the upper body was more balanced over the lower body. Then we proceeded with lower extremity movements, including medial and lateral hamstrings and quadriceps.


2 - 3 - 18 The Pelvis   The theme of this class is the pelvis. We started with a review of pelvic anatomy as well as concepts of motor control, including "long term potentiation (LTP). LTP basically means that the more we use a particular neural network, the stronger it becomes. We are reinforcing the brain map connections of that network. This has implications for good and ill in the way we move and use our body. As usual we started with a body scan, did some warm-up moves especially focused on the pelvis, and then included somatic movements for contracting and releasing the buttock area, back, and more. We spent a good deal of time on the movements of the pelvis in walking.


1 - 6 - 18 Breathing and the Pelvis   Today's class started with some neurological information about top down cortical processing versus bottom up subcortical processing.  Then we began class with somatic breathing movements and then focused much of the class on the hip-pelvis area.


12 - 9 - 17 Movements for Sciatica and the Psoas   Class starts with some basic anatomy of the sciatic nerve and the psoas muscles. This class is a good example of incorporating more specialized movements into the basic Daily Cat Routine ("Somatics," by Thomas Hanna). At the end of class we'll stand up and continue to focus somatically on standing and walking movements.


11 - 4 - 2017 Somatic Movement Relaxation   This class contains a general Hanna Somatic Routine with variations of the Daily Cat Routine. Later in the class I lead a "Somatic Movement Relaxation" which can be used for general anxiety, calming, or to help you go to sleep. At the very end of the class I lead a short walking integration. Remember the feedback to your brain from your body has changed due to the change in muscle tonus from doing the somatic movements. Thus it is very helpful to walk after a floor session allowing the brain to integrate the changes.


10 - 7 - 17 My Daily Somatic Movement Routine   My Daily Somatic Movement Routine. I am frequently asked what I do for my daily somatic routine. This class is an example of a routine I might do. My general guideline is to follow the regular Daily Cat Movements and add a few variations of each movement as I go through the routine. I spend between 15 - 30 minutes a day. I always explore different variations or cycle around to variations I haven't done for a while. I include movements I've learned from others as well as those I've made up myself. Sometimes I add seated, standing, walking, and breathing movements as well.


9 - 9 - 17 Mobilizing all the Major Joints   This class focuses on moving through the joints of the body, from feet to head. Each joint movement is done as a voluntary pandiculation. This sequence both helps you assess each joint as well as release excess muscular contraction and pain or stiffness at each joint. This sequence is great to do in the morning to mobilize each joint. This sequence is also great to do before bed to help relax and prepare you for a good night's sleep.


8 - 5 - 17 Working with the Sides of the Body   In this class we focused on movements of the lateral line or sides of the body. The oblique muscles at the sides of the waist are at the somatic center of the lateral line. Muscles of the side of the body at the neck, rib cage, pelvis and down the legs are crucial for stability. We have muscles that control forward and backward movements, turning or rotational movements, and side to side movements. When movement in all three of these planes are in balance, our movements are graceful and we rise upward in gravity.


7 - 22 - 17 Pelvic Movement   This class focuses on the movements of the pelvis. We reviewed some anatomy on the skeleton first, including the hip joints, sacroiliac joints, pubis, and lumbosacral joint. We moved our pelvis in the 3 dimensions of space: forward-backward; side to side; and horizontally. We also noticed how pelvic movement effects movement in other areas of our body.


6 - 3 - 17 Extremities and Trunk Support    In this class we do specific movements for the upper extremity, including upward and downward rotation of the scapula. We also do specific movements for the lower extremity, including hip flexion, extension, rotation, as well as hamstring and quad movements. Interwoven with the extremity movements, are movements for the trunk and spine. It is the efficient functioning of the trunk and spine which is the foundational and organizing support for competent and pain free movement of the limbs (extremities).


5 - 20 - 17 Hip and Knee Joints   This class focuses on hip joints and knees in the context of a full body routine. A number of students wanted movements for stiff hips, especially hip flexion. And they loved this class for all the movements pertaining to hips. The other request was for knee issues. We thoroughly worked with the hamstrings and quads at the knees.


4 - 29 - 17 Full Body   This class is another example of working with Hanna Somatic movements for the whole body. This class both incorporates some of the Daily Cat Routine created by Thomas Hanna, and also a number of other movements that work seamlessly with the basic movements.


3 - 29 - 17 Full Body   With this class you'll be led through a full-body, head-to-toe, somatic movement experience. Enjoy the leisurely pace and the feeling of ease and comfort as you move all your joints and muscles in simple patterns.


3 - 4 - 17 Finding Your Somatic Center This class focuses on paying attention to the participation of the somatic center during movement. Thomas Hanna defined the somatic center as the central area of the trunk between the pelvis and rib case. We focused on the participation of the somatic center in a number of movement patterns. One was the diagonals between opposite shoulder and hip during walking. We also experienced the participation of the somatic center in lateral movement lying in different relationships to gravity: on our backs, sides, and bellies. Enjoy more examples as you listen to the recording.


1 - 28 - 17 The Pelvis and Walking   In this class we focus on movements of the pelvis, especially lateral movement. In walking, this would be the up-down direction of the pelvis. The foot that takes the ground is pushed upward from the ground reaction force. Learn slow, gentle somatic movements that allow you to adapt and adjust your pelvis to walking and other activities.


1 - 17 - 17   The brain organizes our movement patterns. Start the new year, 2017, with both a review of some of the basic Cat Routine Movements, and a few variations that really get into the low back.


12-17-16   Perception and Movement  This class starts with some information regarding improving movement by improving perception. Perception is integrated with our past experiences. By being present in the moment and moving slowly we can help our brain re-organize our ability to move with adaptability, ease, and comfort.


12-3-16   Release Tight, Contracted Muscles Throughout Your Body   In this class we go from the head and neck all the way down to the feet. Learn a number of variations related to the Daily Cat Routine by Thomas Hanna. This class is great for releasing a tight back and pelvis.


10-22-16   Somatic Movements for Arms and Legs     Class 2 of 2.  In this class we'll experience how the spine and trunk support the movements of our arms and legs. Due to time, we did more with the legs than the arms. A future class will do more movements of the arms and how they are supported by the spine and trunk.


10-8-16     Somatic Movements for Arms and Legs.   Class 1 of 2.  In this class we'll experience how the spine and trunk support the movements of our arms and legs. Due to time, we did more with the legs than the arms. A future class will do more movements of the arms and how they are supported by the spine and trunk.


9-10-16     In this class I explore many variations of the basic Cat Routine Movements. For example I combine "Arch and Flatten" with a movement down the legs and into the feet and toes to connect the whole spine with the lower body. I've also included a number of parts of a wonderful somatic movement called, "the Barrel," which reinforces rotational movement in the trunk with forward-backward leg and arm movement. Enjoy the many variations and nuances of the basic Cat Routine to enhance and supplement your daily routine.


8-27-16    In this class we focus on some movements of the sacroiliac (S-I) joints and the surrounding area of the low back, pelvis, and hips. Many people experience pain in this general area. These somatic movements release the musculature of that area. Pain relief, less stiffness, and movement comfort result.


7-30-16    The opening of this class starts with some information about "Sensory-Motor Learning" and "Sensory-Motor Amnesia (SMA)." After our "body scan," we did some movements for the lower limbs and ribs. Then we spent quite a bit of time on our sides doing some beneficial movements of rotation, especially as rotational movements apply to walking. The class ended with some head/neck movement.


7 - 23 - 16   Self Assessment and Somatic Movement   This class starts with some ways to do some self assessments while lying on the floor, so that at the conclusion of your movement time, you can re-check yourself. Much of the class was focused on movements pertaining to the "somatic center," the area of they body between the lower border of the rib cage and the pelvic bones. Toward the end of class we also focused on some elbow and foot movements requested by some of the participants.



6 - 25 - 16   Spinal Mobility
This class focuses on spinal movements that promote mobility/flexibility and release tight contracted muscles. Movements for all six ranges of motion of the spine are taught: flexion, extension, right and left lateral flexion (side bending), and right and left rotation. Movements are done lying on the back, side, and belly for a comprehensive journey into somatic spinal movement.


6 - 4 - 16   Shoulder Girdle and Pelvis
This class focuses on movements of the shoulder girdle and their connections through the somatic center, into the low back and pelvis, and down the legs. Movements of the shoulder girdle include the following muscle groups: upper trapezius, lower trapezius, anterior serratus, levator scapula, rhomboids, pectoralis major and minor. Other movements include "connectors" of the upper body and pelvis such as latissimus dorsi, abdominals, obliques, and paravertebrals.


5 - 21 - 16
This class started with a discussion of the right and left hemispheres of the brain. The focus of the Somatic movements was a bit of everything: full body movements, lower body movements, and upper and lower body rotational movements.


5 - 7 - 16   Somatics from the Waist Down
Kelli Peacock and myself, Susan Koenig, co-taught this class: "Somatics from the Waist Down," at the Breathe Center in Berkeley, Ca. This Center has oxygen available and some participants came early in order to try this fascinating therapy. The "somatics" part of the class focused on the lower body with some full body integration moves.


4 - 30 - 16
In Hanna Somatic Education movements we are working with the sensory-motor cortex to get out of pain by reducing chronic muscular contraction. In this process we are also updating the various mapping systems in our brain - cortical and sub-cortical. Each class covers movements throughout the body and helps to efficiently mobilize all the major joints such as the head/neck, shoulders, spine, pelvis-hips, knees, and feet.


4 - 9 - 16
Hanna Somatic Movements are foundational and are easily combined with other exercise and fitness programs. In Hanna Somatics you learn to release contracted muscles which creates balance and ease of joint movement in the body. Exercising with an imbalanced body with many muscles contractions sets you up for pain and injury. Do your Hanna Somatic Movements and enjoy exercise, sports, yoga, weight training, etc... without pain, stiffness, and injury.


3 - 26 - 16   Releasing Tight Muscles using the Shoulder and Scapula
In this class you will learn how to direct your shoulder and scapula toward different parts of your trunk to release tense, tight, painful muscles of the front and back of your body. You can learn do this sitting at your desk, standing, lying in bed or on the floor.


3 - 19 - 16 Partial Class
Muscles are controlled by the nervous system: brain, spinal cord, and nerves. Sensory feedback informs motor function in a continual feedback loop. Today's class continues some of the themes from 2/27/16 with its focus on rotation. In today's class, rotational and other movements are led from supine, prone, and side-lying to enhance walking, standing posture, and ease of trunk joint movements.


2 - 27 - 16 Side Lying Movements
This class focuses on side-lying movements for the upper and lower trunk, especially movements of rotation. After some warm ups , my colleague and Certified Hanna Somatic Educator, Ken Bridgeman, led the class in a wonderful sequence from side-lying to improve the rotational movements of walking.


2 - 20 - 16 Sitting Posture and More
Sitting Posture: we all know slouching is not good for us. Physically it compromises breathing, creates a habitual pattern of pain and stiffness by contracting muscles for long hours in the head/neck, shoulders, spine, and pelvis. Emotionally we may feel a lack of vitality and may even feel depressed over time. Socially the slouching posture may inhibit communication, a readiness for attention and engagement, and it sure does not look sexy!


1 - 30 - 16 Body Connections
Our brain and body are completely connected. Every movement represents neural connections and patterns in the brain, directly affecting our thoughts, emotions, and self-image.


9 - 12 - 15
Somatic Movement Class


10 - 24 - 15
Somatic Movement Class


8 - 22 - 15
Somatic Movement Class


8 - 15 - 15
Among the themes were walking, contralateral movement, diagonal movements between opposite shoulders and hips. Also a great standing movement for the hamstrings and quads.


7 - 25 - 15
This class explains Hanna Somatics in terms of being an educational process. As we do movements focused on different parts of the body, the Hanna Somatics concepts are reviewed.


6 - 27 - 15
How to start helping yourself and others when you strain some muscles. Walking exploration is included and part of the somatic movement explorations.


6 - 6 - 15
Somatic Movement Class


5 - 9 - 15
Enjoy doing Hanna Somatic slow, gentle movement from this May 9, 2015 class.


4 - 18 - 15
Enjoy this Hanna Somatic Movement Class. Move slowly and within your comfort zone. Pay attention to the sensations of the movements. By moving slowly you are allowing your motor cortex to reset the resting tonus of the muscles.


4 - 11 - 15
Hanna Somatic Education Movement Class


8 - 24 - 14
Hanna Somatic Movement Class.


8 - 23 - 14
Hanna Somatic Movement Class.


8 - 2 - 14
Saturday Morning Hanna Somatic Movement Class.


3 - 28 - 15
Saturday Morning Hanna Somatic Movement Class.


3 - 21 - 15
Saturday morning Hanna Somatic Education Movement Class.



2 - 21 - 15
Saturday morning Hanna Somatic Education Class.


1 - 24 - 15
Learn neck/head movements from sitting and lying on floor. The position of the head/neck is important to efficient posture and movement. These days the worst culprit for most of us is "computer posture." Also, practice integrating head/neck movements into full body movements.


12 - 13 - 14
Learn the "pelvic clock" movement. This may be the key for you to release pain and discomfort in your low back, pelvis, and hips. By learning to move your pelvis and low back in various vectors of "clock" movements, you re-connect your brain and muscles in the hub of the body.


12 - 6 - 14 Segment 3
Move with more awareness of 3-D space. Focus on movements oriented to the mid-sagittal plane, mid frontal(coronal) plane, and mid transverse (horizontal) plane. Feel these planes of movement through your pelvis, spine, and body.


12 - 6 - 14 Segment 1
Move with more awareness of 3-D space. Focus on movements oriented to the mid-sagittal plane, mid frontal(coronal) plane, and mid transverse (horizontal) plane. Feel these planes of movement through your pelvis, spine, and body


11 - 22 - 14
Comfortable walking means your whole body is working as a well coordinated whole from head to toe. The somatic movements in this class include head/neck, spinal rocking, lateral movements from side lying, and highlighting foot participation in twisting.


11 - 8 - 14 Partial Segment 2
Due to a technical error, this segment only partially recorded. However, this partial segment offers some helpful movements.


11 - 8 - 14 Segment 1
Learn about how to functionally improve posture and alignment in relationship to walking. Upgrade your brain's internal body maps to enable your nervous system to organize your musculoskeletal system for easier, competent, and more comfortable walking.


11 - 1 - 14 Walk
Increase your walking intelligence by releasing chronically contracted muscles so your brain can coordinate and sequence your walking with more ease and grace. This class starts with the fundamentals of spinal mobility. Each class during November and December of 2014 will offer additional aspects contributing to your “walking intelligence.”


9 - 13 - 14 Pelvis Segment 3
Many people consider the pelvis the hub of the body. Upper body weight is transmitted down the spine and then must be transmitted into the pelvis at the lumbosacral joint. From there, weight should be equally distributed through the sacroiliac joints to the hip joints and then down the legs to the feet which ultimately meet the ground. The somatic movements in each of these segments will help you release contracted muscles around and through your pelvis, helping you gain balanced, competent movement in the pelvic joints and related musculature. Enjoy.


9 - 13 - 14 Pelvis Segment 2
Many people consider the pelvis the hub of the body. Upper body weight is transmitted down the spine and then must be transmitted into the pelvis at the lumbosacral joint. From there, weight should be equally distributed through the sacroiliac joints to the hip joints and then down the legs to the feet which ultimately meet the ground. The somatic movements in each of these segments will help you release contracted muscles around and through your pelvis, helping you gain balanced, competent movement in the pelvic joints and related musculature. Enjoy.


9 - 13 - 14 Pelvis Segment 1
Many people consider the pelvis the hub of the body. Upper body weight is transmitted down the spine and then must be transmitted into the pelvis at the lumbosacral joint. From there, weight should be equally distributed through the sacroiliac joints to the hip joints and then down the legs to the feet which ultimately meet the ground. The somatic movements in each of these segments will help you release contracted muscles around and through your pelvis, helping you gain balanced, competent movement in the pelvic joints and related musculature. Enjoy.


9 - 6 - 14 Segment 2 Diagonals
The walking diagonals refer to the diagonal lines from opposite shoulder to hip across the trunk, both on the anterior and posterior body. Being able to coordinate these diagonals through the trunk to the limbs supports comfortable, well organized walking.


9 - 6 - 14 Segment 1 Diagonals
The walking diagonals refer to the diagonal lines from opposite shoulder to hip across the trunk, both on the anterior and posterior body. Being able to coordinate these diagonals through the trunk to the limbs supports comfortable, well organized walking.